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20121227
20121227
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
us on the third thursday. today, we have a special program about san francisco's neighborhoods geology. we have frank, the geotechnical engineer who will walk us through a lot of this. we also have an architect who knows a lot about the history of the city. he keeps his eyes open and has a lot of information to share. we also have the chief building inspector. we are going to go through this by having frank give us a brief overview of the geology of sentences go. then we're going to look at a series of slides around the city. and see how the geology of the city affects the environment. their special problems and issues that arise we will try to answer questions as we go, particularly related to how the environment release to the underlying geology of the city. those are questions that rarely get asked. this is a chance for you to join us and ask your questions as well. welcome, frank. i see that you brought a big aerial photograph with overly geology. >> it is a big google map with overly geology. the different colors depict the different formations or deposits beneath san fran
zoned areas don't have a lot of yard. even many residential neighborhoods, many houses in san francisco just don't have appropriate yard sizes. over a year-ago we started to look at the potrero neighborhood for many reasons but one of the main reasons at preponderant we're roberted in bernal heights and this is the sister neighborhood. when i first walked into harvard street i could visualize the school. even our children are involved in everyday planning and we want to have a small school no more than 20 kids and a school with small teacher-children ratios which reflects san francisco values. by teaching social responsibility and justice, inclusion, green living, bean a small locally run business while providing a curriculum that prepares children academically, socially and emotional for kindergarten. commissioners it was not our in[t-ebts/] to bulldoze into the neighbor and not include our new neighbors in the process. i have never done this before and if anything i have been a bit naive in the process. i thought everyone would be happy a small mom and pop school -- excuse me, especia
highlights the many services and if he is activities that occur in san francisco and in our city. and so while we take a pause, for a moment, to bring some more art into our hall, we would like to pause for one more musical enter lewd and to begin with the rest of our program. so thank you all very much. ♪ ♪ (applause). . (applause). . . >> thank you guys so much for that beautiful performance can we give them another round of applause? (applause). >>> all the this time if i can ask mr. joaquin torrez to join us again on stage, joaquin will be introducing the mayor and if i can ask my fellow committee members to also join us on stage. joaquin. >> thank you very much i have to say as director the mayor's oches of neighborhood services it's refreshing to have a mayor so dedicated to couldn't and it makes my job easier when our people in the community want to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage m
as mayor of san francisco, i know that the chief and i and supervisor cohen and dr. campbell and the whole public health staff have always had dialogue and been concerned especially when there is an uptick in june of this year on violent crime and homicides in san francisco. and, so, we've been working together on creating a program which i announced some months ago, the ipo program, the ability to work on things that would interrupt and intervene earlier in the behavior patterns of people that would be both victims and perpetrators of violent crime in our city. to support the police department and law enforcement system of doing more predictive policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction.
. welcome, everybody, welcome to san francisco. to some of you, welcome to the presidio, welcome to this absolutely gorgeous futures without violence center. i want to start by thanking futures without violence and esther solar for giving us this beautiful space to meet in today. is esther here? i haven't seen her. we'll thank her later. they made this space available for us. good morning, my name is me linda hague for those of you who don't know me. i was appointed by president obama a little more than two years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking about bullying and we asked all of you to be here and i want to explain the origin of that and why this happened. you people, everybody in this room, has been involved in this issue and is doing incredible work on this issue and we were so honored to be a part of it and to meet with all of you and to s
of the time in san francisco, so conditions are really variable and then it's usually controlled rather than kind of normal. yeah? >> so, in general where possible, staying away from plastic water bottles is not only making your life a little bit healthier, it's decreasing our dependence on plastic which is more important as a broader environmental issue, but even water bottles, even if you leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot
>> san francisco is home to some of the most innovative companies of the 21st century. this pioneering and forward looking spirit is alive in san francisco government as well. the new headquarters of the san francisco public utilities commission at a5 25 golden gate avenue is more than just a 13-story building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building
with san francisco bike coalition, boma san francisco building as the association, union square ccd and real estate department and we received comments from many of the stakeholders. staff also researched on best practices in comparable cities. we looked at portland, vancouver, new york, and also national doubt data from the association of pedestrian and bicycles. based on research, we have made some changes. i will first briefly discuss the impetus behind this legislation and next summarize the existing bicycle parking requirements in the planning code and discuss the ordinance in detail. i want to acknowledge sfmta, who is here, if you have any questions. bicycle ridership has significantly increased in san francisco over the past few years. sfmta's annual count shows ridership has more than doubled since 2006. this report also estimated over 75,000 daily bike commutes in san francisco. with all of that ridership, the city has only 3,000 bike racks on the sidewalks. it requires better infrastructure, including bicycle parking. the san francisco bike plan was adopted in 2009, a col
in san francisco. we all have stories of guys involved with the gang. everyone has a different story of why they joined. my thing is, i believe it works for me to be involved with kids who were in gangs -- i worked with all of the shot colors and i had a goal while i was there. it took me 10 years before i started to transform my life. in the meantime i have the goal that i wanted to be out here. i wanted the opportunity. i was given a life sentence in 1979. i was involved in gang and i caught a murder case. 15 years to life -- and i came here in 1979 and i got out -- and i have been out for almost five years. in my heart, i knew i found a solution when i was incarcerated. and there are different stories. some of the kids joined the gangs because they want to fit into something. some of them don't have a family, and the father and mother are working. for a lot of kids, there is a lot of idle time. it is not like, i will join the gang and i will shoot you. you grow up that way, and before you know you are cutting school. this is begins. working with the different kids that we have, th
grateful. from the san francisco police department from greg sir to denise flair erty and cheryl jennings and the girl friday and kept us moving all day and to the communications that we got the word out through the media and laura who kept us moving today and financial support. if you read about the justice department in the paper you know we can't pay for anything. when people come to my office quite literally i can't give them coffee. people think the government is high flying and i am here to tell you it's not true. there was support for this event and we couldn't be more grateful to the people that made this possible and the rosenberg foundation and they are here, the san francisco foundation and dr. sander herself and a round of applause, the california endowment and others provided tremendous financial support so thank you very much for that. [applause] . we really do appreciate it and the cohost and mary lee and tom torque son and who you met this morning and our next panel is planning for student safety opportunity and success and planning for action around the bay. our mod
for the city and county of san francisco in 1989 as the investigator for the city's first whistle blower program. prior to employment with the city and county of san francisco, he was the managing attorney for the asian law caucus. i first met ed in 1992 when he became the executive director for the human rights commission and we were both 16. that's two decades ago, ed. i watched him soon become the director of city purchasing and then going on to become the director of public works. i think ed is the only mayor in city history that can carry tlau on the campaign promise to fill the potholes because he actually knows how and he's the only mayor in city history that can say he actually knows every single city street because his crews probably paved them. i have had the privilege of working alongside ed for many years in city government. he has always been a cherished colleague and friend to everyone in city hall. he's done the job, he gets the job done, never wanting credit, just the satisfaction of doing the right thing for the people he serves in the city and county of san francis
in san francisco to enjoy yourself. eventually fisherman's wharf moved into youctionv to where the explore or yum is and it moved back up here. but in the 1950s, the port was coming out of world war ii, was trying to understand what container station was going to look like, and they commissioned a study that looked at the economic impact of the port to the city. * that sounds familiar, does continue, mr. mayor? and particularly to how the port could participate in the city's tour and commercial industries as well as their cargo industry, and specifically that report found that this area, since we were moving into containerization, were no longer really needed for cargo, that cargo would be better off being in the southern waterfront. and we would have this area devoted to more commercial activities, entertainment, dining, et cetera. and, so, in the early 1950s, the port moved forward and had the franciscan restaurant built. as part of that. and this area we are standing on was an old timber wharf that supported parking for the fisherman's wharf area, of course, all the other re
in san francisco, actually raised across the street at 415 vincente. i've been looking across at the old miller house and knew the millers well and now welcome our new neighbors in a brand new beautiful house. we'd love to see the old one disappear. for a number of years now, i look sd directly across at the millers and the mas and vincente street, from the front of my house is a very dark street, gets very little light. i look across at the mas and see how they have totally blinded by these huge horrible trees that come out of 422. i know that's not your issue. but now what is being proposed is that they cut off all of the light on their north side, and put them in a canyon. and they have got two little kids that, vincente is not a good street to be playing on. it's a very busy street. and i'm sure that the kids spend a lot of time in the backyard. to put them in a dark cavern i don't think is right. as i said we totally welcome a new house. we welcome our new neighbors. i just don't -- i just ask that you follow through, and take the recommendation of your own planning department, and
in san francisco at this location. we have just recently completed an investigation for the expansion of cathedral school, and they chose to go down 20 feet below the surface of the street, and it was incredibly hard. it was harder than the concrete that was placed as a foundation. the rock beneath the concrete was 10 times stronger than the concrete that is used to support the building. >> okay, moving to another part of the city, this is the eastern side. >> this is on army street? >> yes, this is army st., se. look at all that stuff. it is an active city. >> a lot of the old industrial, the american can co., goodman lumber. all that good stuff. >> wow. >> and this building is one of the examples of remaining 1906 earthquake damage. it has been repaired above, and that is where they repaired the damage. what did they found these buildings on, back in the early days? >> those days, remember i mentioned early on, it would use of redwood grillage and they would extend the grillage up far enough so it would spread out the load. today, one would know when to evaluate a building like this
to develop those local solutions. obviously, san francisco is blessed with a probation chief and she told me earlier that certain people are supervised by probation and is not the general rule throughout california. i think los angeles, where i'm from, there was no supervision for misdemeanors by the probation department. those individuals were on court summary probation which meant go home and sin no more. and if you do, you'll be back here to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with
. they are just an important element in the house is in san francisco. >> i think we can talk about how bathrooms had changed in san francisco. the old-style we're used to have a separate compartment for the bathtub, and now, we have a whole different concept. >> traditionally in san francisco with victorian and edwardian, we had split bathrooms. a separate room for a toilet, and a second room for a tub. i have done literally dozens of projects where we try to combine them. the difference in today's baffin's is there is a lot more stuff. double vanities, soaking tub, showers, toilets, bedets, a lot more things going on. >> has this economic decline at the moment -- has that affected people's desire for complexity in stuff? have you seen a short-term move toward simplicity? >> yes and no. people still love their bathrooms. people think of them as an important room, as an investment for their home. yes, there is the gamut. some people are really just for function and utilitarian. some of them are large and lavish and everything in between. >> we are going to start looking at a couple of little vign
, because this is the heart of san francisco. as i said before, they provide 70% of the jobs here. most people do not realize that. small businesses are what provides jobs here. they provided locally and the hon not going to go, they are not going to offshore their jobs any time. i think we're in a very difficult city. we have tons of permits, tons of different apartments to go through. i wish there were a way to streamline the process, just to make it easier for them to be here in san francisco. >> what are your thoughts about expanding the tax breaks, giving business to other areas in your district? >> i talked a little bit earlier about raising taxes and raising revenues and fees, and for me, the tax exemption is something i do not philosophically supports. yet, i often represent part of san francisco that has been neglected for decades, and that is the midmarket corridor. we have over 3 million square feet of commercial real estate. a lot of it has been vacant for decades. the building twitter is going to be using, it has been vacant since 1968. we have to start looking at what tool
. there are two ami tables that we use in san francisco. there is a tri-county, or three county ami table. at one point the board of supervisors directed us to use a san francisco-specific table and given the relative wealth of our adjacent counties to the south and north, san francisco's ami is about 10% lower than the tri-county ami. so san francisco -- 100% ami is equivalent to 90% in san francisco and that is called out here. similarly on the rental side, it coordinates to 55%. >> i understand what you are doing, but i don't really understand why an off-sale unit would be at 70 and not 90? what is the difference between that being on-site and off-site? >> i think my understanding that this policy is a consistent policy that we have had. unfortunately i can't speak to the distinction between those ami levels. how to i believe it's not a new policy. it's consistent with what we have seen previously. >> it's significant for me and any time we approve these projects for sale that was at the tri-county and i understand your adjustment. the other problem is the downward adjustment raises the s
of san francisco proper. berkeley has stopped it and i think davis is one of the few communities that does that anymore. licensing of bicyclists is something that would be preempting state law. we cannot license bicyclists at the local level without making changes to the state code. and aside from that, i like i said, i will make sure that the staff report finds it. there are a number of other challenges, but that is primarily the main one that legally it can't be done. >> is portland still doing it? >> to my knowledge nobody in the country has a program whereby bicyclists are licensed. with the san francisco bicycle coalition and we get funding from the county transportation authority and we offer these classes free. so there is lots of education going on out there. >> thank you. commissioner borden, following up on commissioner sugaya's tangent, because i have had my bike stolen in last year and in the business below me, someone broke the window and took the bicycle out in the middle of the nightist would recommend -- obviously not licensing, but some sort of registry proce
when you think about it in those terms. that's what bullying is so in san francisco unified we say we have a zero tolerance for bullying or any kind of activity like bullying i want to decouple zero tolerance from the notion of having punitive measures because we don't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spani
offender in san francisco and you've handled dozens of drug case, drug possession cases, you've been -- a lot of people caught their attention when you were quoted in the press saying the way we handle drug enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform i
, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their help and support. it is my pleasure to introduce the president elect of the bar association of san francisco. they provide conflict attorneys to handle cases when a defender is not available. >> i am the president elect of the bar association. we're very proud to co-sponsor the justice of it. on behalf of the 8000 members, and all of those who -- dedicate their careers -- we are very fortunate to have his leadership with top-notch legal representation. for those who were charged each year who are innocent. an important part of the mission is providing equal access to justice. this is shared by his office and all the public defenders. we're proud of the conflict panel that he described, and we also provide the top-notch representation in matters that his office cannot handle. we applaud you for what you do and for those of you who could not make it, thank you very much. this year's public defender simon will be an interesting day, full of cutting edge issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are
. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and b
specifically the asian, inc., with san francisco housing development corp., san francisco's lgbt center, et cetera. specifically to try to target outreach to the api lgbt latino and african-american communities, as well as working with homeownership sf, which was a elaborative of all the different homeownership organizations, as well as consumer credit outreach. there are additional barriers to access those units. whenever anyone contact ours offices and said can you contact about bmr us about opportunities, everybody gets an email blast about an opening in the program. we approved the marketing plans of each of the development s where developers post on craigslist and other publications. we have also been attempting to assess what more we can do? clearly the numbers on the rental side, i think, we're rear view mirrorly relatively happy with. on the ownership side we have been working with our homeownership counseling groups to determine what is it that proves to be the stumbling block? one is the timing to actually successfully apply. we have attempted to do, i think, a better job with t
behind in regards to affordable housing. i would like to close by saying that coalition for san francisco neighborhoods supports adaptable use for senior housing or another preservation alternative. to pursue enforcement actions for building code and ceqa violations. please wait 12 months before this project is considered. >> did you call rowena jen? >> yes. rowena had to leave and so i have this statement that they are back hacking up the building again. >> is there any additional public comment on this item? >> yes. good afternoon commissioners my name is elizabeth gordan and i with my co-owners own the building next door, 1630 clay street. it's a 6-unit residential building and i'm speaking on behalf of all the owners of 1630 clay street today. our building is the neighboring building most impacted bit proposed project. we have been supportive of this project conditionally since 2006. with this said, when we last testified before you on june 28th, we reported that we were in discussion with the project sponsor and architect to address our concerns. we had yet however to reach an a
much. i really give a shout out to san francisco unified because they have been very, very on top of this issue, way ahead of the curve. >> thank you, gentlemen, so much. (applause). >> just a couple of comments. we're not going to take a big official break. if people need to get up individually, please do so. we have one more panel then we will take a break, a lunch break, lunch will be served at the table and you will have time at that point to chat with people and to take a break. before we move to the next panel, if i could have your attention, please, i just want to acknowledge some of the people in the room today are our law enforcement partners. and some of them have come almost directly from a funeral yesterday of a fallen hero, kenyon youngstrom, of the california hunters point. i want to eepblg the loss of one of our heroes on the california hunters point, kenyon youngstrom, who protect us and keep us safe every day. we acknowledge you and know you are heroes and we are very, very sorry for the loss of officer youngstrom. our third panel is called prevention and com
's a lot about the work that you are doing with the san francisco giants. so can you talk a bit about how you see the san francisco giants as being those role models and playing an active role and being upstanders? >> part of it is the role model stand point and using baseball as a hook to get people's attention. when we have a captive audience of 40,000 people plus a wide tell television and radio audience, we use that to get across the message about an issue. sometimes we get letters, hey, i came to see a game with my son and instead i'm hearing about a murder committee in yosemite and that's a downer of a way to start the day. sometimes that's a tough conversation with a fan but at least at the end of the day they've taken something away with them. also at the grass roots level we have a junior giants program, it's a youth baseball program throughout california. we use baseball as the hook to get kids to come together to learn about teamwork, we have a whole can urriculum that's based on the importance of reading, literacy, education, we have a whole violence prevention can urriculum,
the bridge, and i know as superintendent talked about, you are doing amazing stuff in san francisco. tony smith in oakland has an initiative that is dealing with not just things like restoretive justice alone but positive behavioral interventions and supports. couple that with response to intervention, whole school reform strategies that work on transforming the way the school is functioning and in so doing making it a more positive culture for everybody. it brings in parental engagement in families and it has the very tough conversations, in the case of oakland i know for sure, around things like race with an african american male focus in that community because it's appropriate for that community, and the way all these things link together. so certainly bullying and harassment is an avenue into transforming the way schools work. just like discipline is an avenue into transforming the way schools work, as is standards and good assessments, it is how all these things fit together to ensure that students feel safe to learn but that what they are learning are the rigorous courses and skil
at the home, we're super lucky because almost every neighborhood in san francisco has a farmer's market, you can grow your own food, test your soil first, local cosmetic pesticide laws have passed in counties and municipalities to reduce the use of pesticides in parks and public areas and then really important is asking the environmental protection act si which is our federal agency that regulates pesticides to look at how chemicals affect breast development in route row and other developments to ensure that pesticides don't have that effect on breasts and mammary grands and animals and that's not happening right now, you would think we would test comb cal effects on breast tissue, generally not happen ining the way it needs to so that's a wonky solution but a super important one. >> [inaudible]. >> yes? >> you cannot really boil to kill it? >> so, it's always good to wash your fruits and vegetables but a lot of the pesticide residues don't just wash off, they are in the food, deeper than just the surface, or they adhere really strongly, so you can get some residue off by washing but a lot o
of san francisco, you've committed yourself to that, and yet you've broken away from the position held by, i believe, every other elected district attorney in california to support marar district attorney in califoia to support senator leno's direction. why is that? >> i want to thank marty for being here. even though we disagree, i think it was really important to have the point of view of the 57 other elected d.a.'s in the state. i think it's important to understand in our dialogue so marty, thank you for being here. >> thank you. >> marty is someone i respect a great deal and he has been involved in public safety for a number of years and doing very momably serving the l.a. city attorney as well as his current position. actually, for me this has been a journey, it's not like a light switch went on yesterday. i have been involved in public safety for about 30 years. i have seen the war on drugs from the ground up. i have seen it as a police officer, young police officer walking, foot beat in south central and east l.a. i saw the revolving door, the impact that that revolving door was ha
>> there is no better way to kick off the holiday season than on ice. san francisco has two outdoor skate rinks right in the middle of the hustle and bustle. >> all the way from st. louis just to come to this skating rink right here. >> this is like the perfect place in san francisco. >> it makes me feel like it is the holidays. >> an oasis this rink gives you the option of skating until you drop in union square and while you are at it
of san francisco. this building was a dream that became a reality of a man by the name of james junior elected mayor of san francisco in 1912. he didn't have a city hall because it was destroyed in the earth wake of 1906. construction began in april of 1913. in december 1915, the building was complete. it opened it's doors in january 1916. >> it's a wonderful experience to come to a building built like this. the building is built as a palace. not for a king or queen. it's built for all people. this building is beautiful art. those are architecture at the time when city hall was built, san francisco had an enormous french population. therefore building a palace in the art tradition is not unusual. >> jimmie was an incredible individual he knew that san francisco had to regain it's place in the world. he decided to have the tallest dome built in the united states. it's now stands 307 feet 6 inches from the ground 40 feet taller than the united states capital. >> you could spend days going around the building and finding something new. the embellishment, the carvings, it represents com
after they are injured. at san francisco general hospital a number of gunshot wounds has declined in recent years. in 2007 we cared for 381 shooting victims in our emergency department. 2011, the last year we have data on, that number is now 182 shooting victims. while this is a substantial drop, i submit to you that one is too many. these numbers represent the patients who are transported to the hospital, not the victims who died at the scene or do not come in for care. many people are killed from homicides, but suicide taking one's life with weapons is much more common in the united states. it is a silent killer since more than twice as many people die of suicide than homicide historically in the united states. there is an hep dim i can of violent crime committed with guns and is a serious public health problem that we must confront head on. * it is incidents like this past week bring these terrible crimes out in the public, but the reality is people are killed every day in this country with weapons that permanently change the lives of the families that they are with. in conclus
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)